Elote Recipe

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Elote Recipe by Mr. Make It Happen

Mr. Make It Happen Elote Recipe – Money Shot
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TIMING

PREP WORK

  • Shucking and cleaning corn: 5-10 minutes
  • Coating corn with oil or butter and seasoning: 5 minutes
  • Grilling or baking corn: 15 minutes
  • Preparing the sauce and garnishes: 5-10 minutes

COOKING TIME

  • Grilling or baking corn: 15 minutes

Overall, the cooking time is minimal, primarily focused on grilling or baking the corn. The majority of the time will be spent on preparation, including shucking and cleaning the corn, as well as preparing the sauce and garnishes.


Let’s Make It Happen

Picture this: golden ears of corn, grilled to perfection, slathered with a creamy layer of mayo and Mexican cream (or sour cream), and dusted with a generous sprinkle of chili powder/Tajin and crumbled cheese. This, my friends, is Elote – a beloved Mexican street food that is as delicious as it is iconic. Join me on a journey as we delve into the rich history and irresistible flavors of elote, and discover why this humble snack has captured the hearts and taste buds of food lovers around the world.

A Taste of Tradition:

Elote, also known as Mexican street corn, has a history that spans centuries. Originating in Mexico, elote has long been a staple of street food culture, gracing the carts and stalls of bustling markets and festivals. Traditionally, elote is made by grilling or roasting ears of fresh corn over an open flame until they are tender and charred, imparting a smoky depth of flavor that is simply irresistible.

To start, we need to remove the corn from its husk and remove all of the silk. Get the cleaned corn onto a plate or baking sheet and coat it in some oil or butter. Season them up and fire up the grill. (You could also pop them in the oven for those without access to a grill).

Cook them at about 375 degrees, turning frequently to ensure they cook evenly. We want a nice light char but not burnt. Remove from the grill once the corn is tender (about 15 mins total) and then back inside to prep the rest of our ingredients. 

I like to do a 50/50 blend of Mayo and Mexican Creme or Sour Cream. Add a little lime zest for a pop of freshness to cut through the fat and season to taste with all purpose or salt and pepper.

One of the stars of the show here is Tajin.. if you can find it, grab it. It’s great for cocktails too.. trust me! 

A Symphony of Flavors:

But what truly sets Elote apart is its bold and vibrant flavor profile. After grilling, the corn is typically slathered with a mixture of mayonnaise, lime juice, and spices, which adds a creamy richness and tangy kick to each bite. Then comes the pièce de résistance – a generous sprinkle of chili powder, followed by a shower of crumbled cheese, such as queso fresco or cotija, which melts slightly over the warm corn, creating a luscious coating of cheesy goodness.

Versatility at Its Finest:

One of the most beautiful things about Elote is its versatility. While the classic preparation described above is undeniably delicious, there are countless variations and adaptations to suit every palate. Some may prefer their Elote smothered in hot sauce or drizzled with crema, while others may opt for a healthier twist by substituting Greek yogurt for mayonnaise. The possibilities are truly endless, allowing each cook to put their own unique spin on this beloved dish.

The other star here is Cotija Cheese. If you’re not familiar with it, you’ve gotta try it!

Cotija cheese is a popular Mexican cheese known for its crumbly texture, salty flavor, and distinctive aroma. Named after the town of Cotija in the Mexican state of Michoacán, where it originated, Cotija cheese is made from cow’s milk and is aged, resulting in a firm and dry cheese.

Here are some key characteristics of Cotija cheese:

  • Texture: Cotija cheese has a crumbly texture similar to feta cheese. It is dry and firm, making it easy to crumble or grate over dishes.
  • Flavor: Cotija cheese has a salty and tangy flavor with a slightly sharp edge. The aging process contributes to its rich and robust taste, which enhances the flavor of many dishes.
  • Aging: Cotija cheese is typically aged for several months, which allows its flavors to develop and intensify. During aging, the cheese loses moisture, resulting in a drier texture and a more concentrated flavor.
  • Versatility: Cotija cheese is a versatile ingredient used in a variety of Mexican dishes. It is commonly crumbled over tacos, salads, soups, and grilled corn (elote). It can also be grated and used as a topping for enchiladas, tostadas, or beans, or incorporated into fillings for tamales or quesadillas.
  • Substitutes: If Cotija cheese is not available, you can substitute it with other salty and crumbly cheeses such as feta or Parmesan. While these cheeses may not have the exact same flavor profile as Cotija, they can provide a similar texture and taste when used as a topping or ingredient in Mexican-inspired dishes.

Cotija cheese adds a delicious savory element to dishes and is a beloved ingredient in Mexican cuisine. Its unique flavor and texture make it a favorite among chefs and home cooks alike, adding depth and richness to a wide range of dishes.

Mr. Make It Happen Elote Recipe

Whether enjoyed on the streets of Mexico City or whipped up in your own kitchen, elote is a culinary delight that knows no bounds. Its simple yet satisfying combination of flavors – sweet, smoky, tangy, and spicy – is guaranteed to leave you craving more with every bite. So why not embrace the irresistible charm of Elote and bring a taste of Mexico into your own home? Whether you’re hosting a backyard barbecue or simply craving a midday snack, Elote is sure to satisfy your cravings and leave you longing for just one more ear.

In Conclusion:

In a world filled with culinary delights, few can rival the simple yet sublime pleasures of Elote. With its rich history, bold flavors, and endless versatility, Elote has captured the hearts and taste buds of food lovers around the globe. So why not join the corny love affair and indulge in a taste of Mexico’s most beloved street food? Trust me – once you’ve experienced the irresistible charm of Elote, there’s no turning back


Elote

By: Mr. Make It Happen
Servings: 4 people
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 15 minutes
Total: 35 minutes
Picture this: golden ears of corn, grilled to perfection, slathered with a creamy layer of mayo and Mexican cream (or sour cream), and dusted with a generous sprinkle of chili powder/Tajin and crumbled cheese.

Equipment

  • 1 Basting Brush
  • 1 Mr. Make It Happen Knife or your preferred cutting knife
  • 1 Cutting Board
  • 1 Grill or Grill Pan
  • 1 Baking Sheet

Ingredients 

  • Corn on the cob
  • 4 tbsps melted butter
  • 1/4 cup mayo
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 1 package Cotija cheese
  • tajin or chili powder
  • 1/4 cup cilantro
  • 2 limes
  • All-Purpose Seasoning
  • 1 tsp garlic
  • 1 tsp white sugar
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Instructions 

  • First things first, we need to find some good quality corn. Try to find sweet corn and ensure that it looks robust. (Clean, nice and plump.. and kernels from end to end).
  • To start, we need to remove the corn from its husk and remove all of the silk.
  • Get the cleaned corn onto a plate or baking sheet and coat it in some oil or butter.
  • Season them up and fire up the grill. (You could also pop them in the oven for those without access to a grill).
  • Cook them at about 375 degrees, turning frequently to ensure they cook evenly. We want a nice light char but not burnt.
  • Remove from the grill once the corn is tender (about 15 mins total) and then back inside to prep the rest of our ingredients.
  • I like to do a 50/50 blend of Mayo and Mexican Creme or Sour Cream. Add a little lime zest for a pop of freshness to cut through the fat and season to taste with all purpose or salt and pepper.
  • If you can find any tajin, grab it! It's also great for cocktails. Sprinkle this over the elote and serve!

Notes

Tajin is optional but recommended for added flavor!

Additional Info

Course: Appetizer, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: Mexican

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About Matt Price

I’m Matt Price – A self taught “Home Chef”, or “Internet Chef”, lol, from Virginia. I’m super passionate about cooking and sharing recipes and techniques to elevate home cooking. Too many of us have drifted away from the kitchen – and my goal is to change that! Let’s Make It Happen.

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