Mashed Potatoes

Jump to Recipe

This post contains affiliate links. Please see our disclosure policy.

Mashed Potatoes Recipe by Mr. Make It Happen

Mr. Make It Happen Mashed Potatoes Recipe – Money Shot
Want to save this recipe?
Just enter your email and get it sent to your inbox! Plus you’ll get new recipes from us every week!
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Listen.. I’ve been cooking for a long time now, and there is nothing that I’ve gotten more compliments on than mashed potatoes, lol. I mean, who doesn’t love a good mashed potato? It’s quite possibly the best side dish ever invented, or maybe I’m just Irish and we love our potatoes. Either way, if you want to impress a partner or a house guest, break out this tried and true recipe and thank me later.

To get the party started, we need to discuss which potato to choose while you’re at the grocery store. Some blogs might make this out to be rocket science and try to walk you through every different potato varietal, but we won’t do that. Honestly, it really comes down to one major question for me when I am making my selection… Do I want skin on or skin off? If we are going with skin off mashed potatoes (smoother, less texture, more refined overall) – I am picking Russets. If I want to leave the skin on for added nutrients and texture, we will choose Red or Yukon gold. Boom.. that’s it.. not science lessons required!

Why Choose Russet for Mashed Potatoes?

Why Use Russet? Russet potatoes are often preferred for making mashed potatoes because of their high starch content and relatively low moisture content compared to other potato varieties. Here are some reasons why Russet potatoes are commonly used for mashed potatoes:

  • High starch content: Russet potatoes have a higher starch content compared to other varieties, such as waxy potatoes like red potatoes or Yukon Gold. This high starch content results in a fluffier texture when mashed, making Russets ideal for achieving creamy and light mashed potatoes.
  • Low moisture content: Russet potatoes have a lower moisture content than some other varieties. This means they absorb less water while cooking, resulting in mashed potatoes that are less likely to become watery or gummy when mashed.
  • Light, fluffy texture: The combination of high starch content and low moisture content in Russet potatoes contributes to a light and fluffy texture when mashed. This texture is highly desirable for mashed potatoes, as it allows for smooth, creamy, and airy consistency.
  • Mild flavor: Russet potatoes have a mild flavor compared to some other potato varieties. This mild flavor allows the taste of other ingredients, such as butter, cream, salt, and seasonings, to shine through in mashed potatoes without being overpowered by the potato flavor.
  • Versatility: Russet potatoes are versatile and widely available, making them a convenient choice for mashed potatoes. They are suitable for various cooking methods, including boiling, baking, and mashing.

Break out your potato peeler of choice and peel the skin from the potatoes. I like to do this first before cleaning the potatoes under some cold water. If there are any “ugly spots”, feel free to trim this off as well. Once the potatoes are peeled, cut them into 1 inch cubes and clean them under cold water until the water runs clear.

Flavor Enhancers

Now let’s discuss “flavor enhancers”. These are ingredients that take a recipe over the top. Today, those 2 things include Boursin Garlic and Herb Cheese and Roasted Garlic. (For the roasted garlic, cut the end piece off about 1/4 of the way down, add olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Wrap the garlic tightly in foil and bake at 400 for 40 minutes)

Pro Tips:

One of the mistakes a lot of people make when it comes to mashed potatoes is just randomly tossing cold ingredients into their warm potatoes. This can ruin the consistency of your mashed potato end product and should be avoided unless you’re in a pinch for time.
The best way to execute this is by warming your butter and cream in a skillet over medium low heat. Add aromatics like thyme and rosemary as you see fit and then begin to season this mixture. I like to use a blend of salt, pepper, garlic, onion powder, and chicken bouillon powder.

Why Warm Butter & Cream?

Warming butter before adding it to mashed potatoes serves several purposes, enhancing both the texture and flavor of the dish:

  • Easier incorporation: Warm butter is softer and more pliable, making it easier to incorporate into the mashed potatoes. When added to warm potatoes, the butter melts quickly and distributes more evenly throughout the mixture, resulting in a smoother and creamier texture.
  • Better flavor infusion: Heating the butter allows its flavor to become more pronounced. Warm butter can more effectively infuse its rich, creamy flavor into the mashed potatoes, enhancing the overall taste of the dish.
  • Prevents cooling: Adding cold butter to hot mashed potatoes can cause the temperature of the dish to drop, resulting in lukewarm mashed potatoes. By using warm butter, you help maintain the heat of the mashed potatoes, ensuring they remain warm and enjoyable when served.
  • Enhanced mouthfeel: The warmth of the butter contributes to a pleasant mouthfeel, as it adds a layer of richness and smoothness to the mashed potatoes. This can make the dish more satisfying and enjoyable to eat.

In summary, warming butter before adding it to mashed potatoes facilitates its incorporation, enhances flavor infusion, prevents cooling of the dish, and improves the overall mouthfeel of the mashed potatoes. These factors contribute to creating a tastier and more enjoyable dish.

At this point, this recipe is a blank canvas. You can now make a million variations of mashed potatoes. If you want to do a blue cheese mash, add the blue cheese to the cream mixture. (Horseradish, truffle, lobster, etc could all be executed from this stage)

Once the cream mixture is seasoned to taste, remove the aromatics/stems and pour over your cooked potatoes. Potatoes should be fork tender and easily mashed. Begin the mashing process prior to adding the cream mixture and then finish mashing as you slowly incorporate your butter and cream etc.

If you want an extra silky smooth end product you can use a potato ricer or a hand mixer. Personally, I prefer my potatoes a bit on the chunkier side… like we are when we eat too much mashed potatoes, lol. Garnish with more butter and chives.

Completed mashed potato dish in a white bowl on a counter garnished with butter and chives.
Mr. Make It Happen Mashed Potatoes Recipe

Serve hot, alongside your favorite protein and enjoy.


Mashed Potatoes

By: Mr. Make It Happen
Servings: 6 people
Prep: 10 minutes
Total: 40 minutes
Completed mashed potato dish in a white bowl on a counter garnished with butter and chives.
Listen.. I’ve been cooking for a long time now, and there is nothing that I’ve gotten more compliments on than mashed potatoes, lol. I mean, who doesn’t love a good mashed potato? It’s quite possibly the best side dish ever invented, or maybe I’m just Irish and we love our potatoes. Either way, if you want to impress a partner or a house guest, break out this tried and true recipe and thank me later.

Equipment

  • Mixing Bowl
  • Mr. Make It Happen Chef Knife Preferred Cutting Knife or Potato Peeler
  • Cutting Board
  • Mr. Make It Happen Skillet Preferred Skillet

Ingredients 

  • 1.5 lbs Yukon gold potatoes
  • 2.5 oz Boursin garlic and herb cheese
  • 4 tbsps butter
  • 2 cups half and half
  • 1 tbsp garlic
  • 1-2 tbsps sour cream
  • 1/2 cup shredded parmesan cheese
  • AP seasoning
  • Fresh thyme
  • Diced chive
Save This Recipe!
Get this sent to your inbox, plus get new recipes from us every week!
Please enable JavaScript in your browser to complete this form.

Instructions 

  • Break out your potato peeler of choice and peel the skin from the potatoes. I like to do this first before cleaning the potatoes under some cold water.
  • Once the potatoes are peeled, cut them into 1 inch cubes and clean them under cold water until the water runs clear.
  • For the roasted garlic, cut the end piece off about 1/4 of the way down, add olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Wrap the garlic tightly in foil and bake at 400 for 40 minutes
  • Warm your butter and cream in a skillet over medium low heat. Add aromatics like thyme and rosemary as you see fit and then begin to season this mixture. I like to use a blend of salt, pepper, garlic, onion powder, and chicken bouillon powder.
  • If you want to do a blue cheese mash, add the blue cheese to the cream mixture. (Horseradish, truffle, lobster, etc could all be executed from this stage)
  • Once the cream mixture is seasoned to taste, remove the aromatics/stems and pour over your cooked potatoes.
  • Potatoes should be fork tender and easily mashed. Begin the mashing process prior to adding the cream mixture and then finish mashing as you slowly incorporate your butter and cream etc.

Video

Notes

This recipe will serve about 6-8 people, but you can double it to serve 12-16 for larger groups.
If you want an extra silky smooth end product you can use a potato ricer or a hand mixer. Personally, I prefer my potatoes a bit on the chunkier side… like we are when we eat too many mashed potatoes, lol. Garnish with more butter and chives.
Preheat oven to 400 degrees and begin roasting the garlic as this will take the longest to cook. 

Additional Info

Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American

Find More Recipes…

You Might Also Like:

About Matt Price

I’m Matt Price – A self taught “Home Chef”, or “Internet Chef”, lol, from Virginia. I’m super passionate about cooking and sharing recipes and techniques to elevate home cooking. Too many of us have drifted away from the kitchen – and my goal is to change that! Let’s Make It Happen.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recipe Rating